Everest Ultra Marathon

The mojo has returned! On May 29th, 2019 I will be running the highest ultra marathon event in the world. The Everest Marathon  features a 60km (37 mile) option along with the marathon. I plan to trek to Gokyo Ri while I’m there as well. I’m super excited!

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Details about the race rom the website:

Highlights

  • World’s highest ultra-running event.
  • Starts at Everest Base Camp EBC, 5,356m, at the Khumbu Icefall.
  • The trail passes through five high Himalayan passes.
  • One of the world’s toughest uphill routes.
  • Different route than the normal EBC (get to see different village settlements).
  • Two Nights at EBC where only expedition climbers are allowed to camp.
  • Athletes need to have extreme endurance.

The 60KM ultra marathon is for extreme adventurous. Starting from Everest Marathon, tracks of ultra marathon starts from Everest Base Camp and ends at Namche Bazaar like the full marathon. However, the ultra marathon moves towards Nha La from PHortse and descneds via Mongla towards Namche Bazaar, making it an ultimate adventure run.

New Year Resolutions

Many people criticize those people who make fitness goals on New Year’s day. I love the season. It is a season where many people increase their hope that things can change. Others set their minds on goals they have yet to achieve but have already made. Goals that might take a while to accomplish. Those long, slow, steady goals are often difficult ones to achieve. This takes a level of consistency that is higher than other short-term goals.

As for me this season I’m seeking to make a higher goal than last year. Last year I decided to shoot for 1,000 miles in a year. Unfortunately due to moving on the other side of the world (Nepal) I fell short of my goal by around 250 miles. I did however run 750 miles in the year which is a huge accomplishment from previous years so in that I celebrate. This year I’m setting my goals even higher and shooting for 2,000 miles. This goes along side starting trail running in the Himalayas and seeking the infamous BQ.

Follow along as I shoot for those goals! Even more important though … shoot for yours 🙂

 

Where Art Thou?

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In the process of moving to another country and learning new languages I’ve lost my way. It seem my shoes have dust on them now. I was on a pretty good start for in NYC but then I moved to Kathmandu, often referred to as ‘Dustmandu.’ This dust in the air makes it difficult to get motivated to run of course and then you have to have a mask as well. (Can you imagine running with a mask?). Hopefully when I get a motorcycle I can make my way up to the countryside and get some clean, crisp air to run in.

As the new year approaches lets see if I can sustain my running goals in 2018.

Himalayas here we come!

It’s been a while since I last updated the blog.

Here are a few highlights and pics (below) … new PR on 5k (21:32) & 10k (46:22) and completed my first 50k!

July was quite low in mileage (96miles) due to the end of the month including packing up our home in NYC and visiting family in TN. I did complete my first 50k completing a loop around NYC’s Manhattan Island.

August I got back on track. It has been quite providential before our move to the Himalayas that I get to train on some bigger hills than I’m used to doing in NYC. Around my in-laws house in Chapel Hill, NC there are hills on each side of the drive that avg. about a 225 ft gain in elevation so no matter which way I decide to run it means a dose of hills for training. So what that means is no skipping out and finding the flat sections that my default running mode is used to. There is no other option!

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With the move to the Himalayas approaching at the end of August trail running and ultra running is on my mind. Running hills increases the signals in the whole body to burn more calories, build muscle, and improves lung strength. By throwing in hill repeats or hill climbs into the weekly runs ensures (along with a lower calorie intake) a decrease in the amount of body fat around the waistline which will lead to optimal race weight for maximum performance.

We are planning on living in Kathmandu, Nepal but the real spots to be are in the mountains! The Great Himalaya Trail website features a series of different ways of planning running, mountain biking, trekking in the himalayas which possess some of the most epic mountain views on earth (definitely the highest in elevation!). Other websites such as Great Himalaya Trails feature different types of epic adventure journeys taking different routes. Either way adventure and Nepal go hand and hand and the mountains are there to serve a full dose! Super stoked!

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Traveling and Running

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Running consistently can be difficult but add traveling within the mix and it gets even harder. Recently I took a vacay to Alaska and although I did log 16 miles my volume of running was difinitely affected. This got me curious on helpful tips for helping to maintain running volume on the go. Runner’s World provided some helpful tips that concentrated on adding volume and increasing intensity while you travel. So for instance when you are in the airport find some stairs and run up them or just simply walk thru the airport to add mileage to your day which burns additional calories. They also focused on diet and avoiding eating high fat content food while traveling. I though these tips were very helpful.

A very cool way to travel that most people forget about starts when your register for your flight. Instead of scheduling your flights with little time in between layovers one can simply select a flight with a larger gap between their next departure time. This way you can travel from the airport to downtown and run around many famous landmarks of each city you visit. Of course it may cost you some extra money for a taxi back and forth to the airport but most fine that its worth the effort to visit a cool place a increase the epicness of the trip. It beats saying you have ‘been somewhere’ but didn’t go downtown.

Happy traveling and don’t forget to run. Your body will thank you and you even might sleep on the plane! 🙂

 

 

 

The Risk of Overtraining …

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I’ve lost around 20 lbs since January. I’m up to about 36 miles a week and progressing at a 10% increase in mileage each week. I’ve been monitoring my diet with Under Amour’s Myfitnesspal app. It automatically inputs the calories burned during a workout and tells me the recommended number of calories for replenishment. Because I’m moving to the higher miles (and adding more stress to the body ie. calorie demands, increased muscle repair, etc.) this is now more important than ever to make sure that I’m eating enough to so my body has what it needs to function healthy.

The cycle of stress added by excercise makes your body respond in two ways, it gets stronger or the added stress causes injury. The later is referred to as overtraining. It’s something that is not often talked about but it refers to when the challenges placed upon the body exceed it’s ability to adapt. Explained by the process outlined below you can see how homeostasis is positively or negatively affected by added stress on the body. Overtraining-Overview1.png

Just a quick reminder to monitor calories burned and make sure you are eating enough to rejuevnate your body. Also it is important to remember to rest and ‘listen to your body’ when it is sending signals to take a break. You can always cross-train and take a zero day. Rest assured a zero day is better than months sitting on the couch with an injury.

 

The Impact of Weather on Pace – New PR!

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Recently I have been discovering the role the weather plays in setting PRs. The last half marathon I pariticpated in the end of the race got up to the 70s. It is said that any temperature over 60 degrees your pace begins to fall by 2-3%. When in the 70s 6-7%, 12-15% in the low 80s, and 18-20% at 85 degrees. If your running in anything hotter than this it better be a short run for you increase your risk of heat exhaustion dramatically.

A short way to put it is anything weather in the 50s is PR type of weather. Well the other day was in the 50s! I felt good at 10 miles so I thought I would go for another PR at the half marathon distance and finished 1:37:10 as the final result. Of course this is not an official race time and only a long run but nonetheless I was pretty happy with it.

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Pushing forward!